Guitars ┬╗ Squier Sonic vs Squier Bullet, Affinity, Classic Vibe and More

Squier Sonic vs Squier Bullet, Affinity, Classic Vibe and More

The new Squier Sonic range is a replacement for Squiers Bullet range – at this point their most affordable guitars. It will become Squiers entry point for beginner guitarists looking for their first guitar.

But how does the Squier Sonic compare to the other ranges of Squier guitars? Are they made differently, do they sound better, play better etc. And are they worth the extra cost?

squier sonic vs squier bullet affinity classic vibe and more

Keep reading and I’ll take you through all that and more, with a full in depth look at the specifications for every type.

What is the New Squier Sonic Series?

The Squier Sonic Series is the successor to the legendary Squier Bullet Series. These new guitars and basses offer modern tones, finishes and configurations for an exciting playing experience.

The Differences Between the Squier Sonic Series and Other Squier Series

The main differences between the Squier Sonic series and other Squier Series are:

  • The Squier Sonic series is both thinner and lighter than all the other Squiers, including the Bullet.
  • They come in a few new finishes and colors: Torino Red, Flash Pink, Tahitian Coral, Ultraviolet and California Blue.
  • The Squier Sonic Series has a few new guitars: an Esquire, a single pickup Stratocaster and Telecaster, a Precision Bass and Bronco Bass.
  • The Squier Sonic Mustangs come in an SS pickup configuration and HH.
  • All the Squier Sonics are built to the same scale as Fender guitars. So you can easily upgrade them and change parts.
Squire Sonic Stratocaster Electric Guitar, Ultraviolet, Laurel Fingerboard, White Pickguard
Squire Sonic Stratocaster in Ultraviolet

What is the Difference Between the Squier Sonic Series and Other Squiers

As Squier have quite a few different series of guitars it’s no surprise that they have various specifications. Let’s take a look at how the Sonic Series measures up against all the other ranges.

Squier Bullet vs Squier Sonic Series

As the Sonic is replacing the Bullet range the differences are very small. As mentioned before the body of the Sonic is thinner and lighter and is made from poplar wood, the Bullets on the other hand are made from poplar or basswood.

The Bullets come with Indian laurel fretboards whereas the Sonics fretboards are either Indian laurel or maple.

There aren’t any Esquires or single pickup Strats and Tele’s in the Bullet lineup either. And the color’s the Sonics come in are new. Aside from that they have the same neck shape – C shape – and finish, fretboard radius, nut width, nut material etc.

The truth is there aren’t that many differences between the Sonic and the Bullet series. And that makes sense as the Bullets have been so successful.

If it ain’t broke don’t fix it, right?

But the few changes they have made – the lighter weight, thinner bodies and new models – could prove to make them even more popular than the Squier Bullets.

But seeing as the Bullet will be replaced by the Sonic series soon and won’t you be able to buy them this is all fairly irrelevant!

Squier Bullet Stratocaster HT SSS Electric Guitar, Black, Laurel Fingerboard
Squier Bullet Stratocaster Hardtail SSS

Stratocaster

Telecaster

Mustang

Squier Affinity vs Squier Sonic Series

The Affinity is a small step up in terms of quality and price (although the differences aren’t that noticeable).

My first guitar was a Squier Affinity Stratocaster and it wasn’t bad at all (and they’ve got a lot better since the early 2000’s when I got mine). So I’m a bit of a fan of them.

When compared to the Sonic series, much like the Bullets there isn’t a huge amount of difference. You can get some different pickup configurations, the fret sizes are medium jumbo on the Affinity’s and narrow tall on the Sonic’s, and the bridges vary.

The biggest differences will be the weight, with the Affinity series being noticeably heavier, and the pickups.

The lighter weight of the Sonic series will be good for younger beginners or if you’ve found other guitars too heavy. Being heavier means the Affinity’s will have a bit more sustain though.

And the Ceramic pickups of the Affinity range will give them a bit more ‘oomph’ and bite than the more standard pickups on the Sonic range as well as being more versatile. The Sonics will be more ‘classic’ sounding though.

Note: there isn’t an Affinity Mustang so we can’t compare one with the Sonic Mustang.

Stratocaster

The differences between the Squier Sonic Stratocaster and Squier Affinity Stratocaster are:

  • Fret Size: The Sonic Strat has narrow tall frets and the Affinity Strat has medium jumbo frets.
  • Inlays: The Sonic Strat only comes with pearloid inlays whereas the Affinity Strat has pearloid and black dot inlays.
  • Pickup Configuration: The Squier Sonic Stratocaster has the usual SSS and HSS configurations but also comes in a single humbucker pickup at the bridge version. The Affinity Strat comes in SSS and HSS versions too but also has an HH configuration rather than a single H.
  • Bridge: The Affinity Stratocaster comes with a 2 point tremolo bridge but the Sonic Stratocaster comes with either a 6-Saddle Vintage-Style Synchronized Tremolo with Block Saddles or 6-Saddle Top-Load Hardtail with Block Saddles.
  • Tuners: The Sonic Strat has die-cast sealed tuners whereas the Affinity Strat has sealed die-cast with split shafts.
  • Left Handed: you can get a left handed Sonic Stratocaster and a left handed Affinity Stratocaster.

Telecaster

The differences between the Squier Sonic Telecaster and Squier Affinity Telecaster are:

  • Fret Size: The Sonic Tele has narrow tall frets and the Affinity Tele has medium jumbo frets.
  • Inlays: The Sonic Tele only comes with pearloid inlays whereas the Affinity Tele has pearloid and black dot inlays.
  • Pickup Configuration: The Squier Sonic Telecaster has the traditional SS pickup configuration and a single humbucker pickup at the bridge version. The Affinity Telecater comes in the SS version but also an HH configuration rather than a single H.
  • Bridge: The Affinity Telecaster comes with either 6-Saddle Strings-Through-Body Tele bridge or 6-Saddle String-Through-Body Hardtail With Block Saddles, depending on the pickup configuration. The Squier Sonic Telecaster comes with only a 6-Saddle Top-Load Tele bridge with Block Saddles.
  • Tuners: The Sonic Tele has die-cast sealed tuners whereas the Affinity Tele has sealed die-cast tuners with split shafts.
  • Left Handed: there are no left handed Sonic Telecasters but you can get a left handed Bullet Telecaster.

Squier Contemporary vs Squier Sonic Series

The Squier Contemporary Series is a modern take on some of Fenders classic designs and models. It’s also another step up from the Sonic series, and that again is reflected in the price you pay.

But it’s a good choice if you want some more up-to-date features on your guitar.

The Contemporary’s probably won’t have the same classic or traditional sound as the Sonics will. But you will be getting a bette guitar all round.

Note: there isn’t a Contemporary Mustang so we can’t compare one with the Sonic Mustang.

Stratocaster

There are quite a few major differences between the Squier Sonic Stratocaster and Squier Contemporary Stratocaster:

  • Neck: The Contemporary Strat has a roasted maple neck compared to the Sonic Strats maple neck.
  • Fretboard Wood: The fretboard wood used on the Contemporary Strat is Indian laurel or roasted maple whereas the Sonic Strat uses Indian laurel or maple.
  • Frets: The Squier Contemporary Strat has 22 frets and the Sonic Strat 21 frets.
  • Fretboard Radius: The fretboard radius of the Contemporary Strat is 12″ whereas the Sonic Strats radius is 9.5″.
  • Floyd Rose: The Contemporary Stratocaster comes in a Floyd Rose version and the Sonic Stratocaster doesn’t.
  • Nut Width: The Floyd Rose version of the Contemporary Strat has a locking nut and wider nut width – 1.6875″. The Sonic Strat doesn’t come with a locking nut and the nut width is the more standard 1.65″.
  • Nut Material: The regular nut of the Contemporary Stratocaster is made from Graphite and the Sonic Stratocaster has a synthetic bone nut.
  • Bridge: The Squier Contemporary hardtail Strat has a 6-Saddle String-Through-Body Hardtail bridge With Block Saddles, the hardtail Squier Sonic Strat has a 6-Saddle Top-Load Hardtail bridge with Block Saddles.
  • The Squier Contemporary Strat with tremolo has a 2-Point Synchronized Tremolo with Block Saddles. The Squier Sonic Strat with tremolo has a 6-Saddle Vintage-Style Synchronized Tremolo with Block Saddles.
  • Pickup Configuration: The Squier Contemporary Strat comes in either SSS or HH pickup configurations. The Squier Sonic Strat comes in SSS, HSS and H.
  • Pickups: The Squier Sonic Strat has Squier ceramic single-coil or ceramic humbucker pickups. The Squier Contemporary Strat has Squier SQR Alnico single-coil or SQR Atomic humbucker pickups.
  • Fret Size: The Squier Contemporary Stratocaster has jumbo frets and the Squier Sonic Stratocaster narrow tall frets.
  • Tuners: The Sonic Strat has die-cast sealed tuners whereas the Contemporary Strat has sealed die-cast tuners with split shafts.
  • Left Handed: you can get both left handed Sonic Stratocasters and left handed Contemporary Stratocasters.

Telecaster

  • Neck: The Contemporary Tele has a roasted maple neck compared to the Sonic Tele maple neck.
  • Fretboard Wood: The fretboard wood used on the Contemporary Tele is roasted maple whereas the Sonic Strat uses Indian laurel or maple.
  • Frets: The Squier Contemporary Tele has 22 frets and the Sonic Tele 21 frets.
  • Fretboard Radius: The fretboard radius of the Contemporary Tele is 12″ whereas the Sonic Teles radius is 9.5″.
  • Nut Material: The nut of the Contemporary Telecaster is made from Graphite and the Sonic Telecaster has a synthetic bone nut.
  • Bridge: The Squier Sonic Telecaster has a 6-Saddle Top-Load bridge with Block Saddles and the Contemporary Telecaster has a 6-Saddle Standard Strings-Through-Body bridge with Block Saddles.
  • Pickups: The Squier Sonic Telecaster has either Ceramic single-coils or Ceramic humbucker, whereas the Squier Contemporary Telecaster has Squier SQR Rail Humbucking and Squier SQR Atomic Humbucking pickups.
  • Pickup Configuration: The Squier Sonic Telecaster comes in either SS or a single humbucker configuration. The Squier Contemporary Telecaster only comes in an HH configuration.
  • Fret Size: The Squier Sonic Telecaster has narrow tall frets and the Squier Contemporary Telecaster has jumbo frets.
  • Tuners: The Squier Sonic Tele has die-cast sealed tuners whereas the Squier Contemporary Tele has sealed die-cast tuners with split shafts.
  • Left Handed: there are no left handed Telecasters for either the Squier Sonics or Squier Contemporary’s.

Squier Paranormal vs Squier Sonic Series

Very much the odd one out from the Squier ranges, the Paranormal series brings back some old forgotten Fender models and creates some new, weird hybrids.

It’s not one for the traditionalists but there’s some really interesting options in the Paranormal range.

It does mean that comparing the regular Sonic models – Strat’s, Tele’s etc. – with the Paranormal series is difficult as there aren’t any direct, proper equivalents.

Still, there are some models that get close, so it’s worth looking at how those match up against the Sonics.

Stratocaster

The Stratocaster type guitars in the Paranormal series are the Strat-O-Sonic and Custom Nashville Stratocaster. Here’s how they compare to the Squier Sonic Stratocaster:

  • Body Wood: The Squier Sonic Stratocaster and the Paranormal Custom Nashville Stratocaster both have popar bodies. But the Paranormal Strat-O-Sonic is made from okoume.
  • Neck Finish: The Squier Sonic Strat has a satin finish to it’s neck whereas the Paranomal Strat-O-Sonic and Custom Nashville Strat have gloss neck finishes.
  • Scale Length: The Squier Paranormal Strat-O-Sonic has a 24.75″ scale length, the Squier Sonic Strat and Paranormal Custom Nashville Strat both 25.5″ scale lengths.
  • Fretboard Radius: The Squier Paranormal Strat-O-Sonic has a 12″ fretboard radius, the Squier Sonic Strat and Paranormal Custom Nashville Strat both have a 9.5″ fretboard radius.
  • Frets: The Squier Paranomal Strat-O-Sonic has 22 frets. Squier Sonic Strat and Paranormal Custom Nashville Strat both have 21 frets.
  • Nut Material: The Squier Paranomal Strat-O-Sonic has a graphite nut. Squier Sonic Strat and Paranormal Custom Nashville Strat both have synthetic bone nuts.
  • Pickups: The Squier Sonic Stratocaster has Squier ceramic single-coil or ceramic humbucker pickups. The Squier Paranormal Strat-O-Sonic and Custom Nashville Stratocaster have Fender-designed Alnico soapbar single-coil pickups.
  • Pickup Configuration: The Squier Sonic Stratocaster comes in SSS, HSS and H pickup configurations. The Squier Paranormal Strat-O-Sonic only comes in SS and Paranormal Custom Nashville Stratocaster only comes in SSS.
  • Bridge: The Squier Sonic Stratocaster has either a 6-Saddle Vintage-Style Synchronized Tremolo bridge with Block Saddles or 6-Saddle Top-Load Hardtail bridge with Block Saddles. The Paranormal Strat-O-Sonic has a Compensated Wrap-Around bridge and the Paranormal Custom Nashville Strat has a 3-Saddle Vintage-Style Strings-Through-Body bridge with Chrome Barrel Saddles.
  • Left Handed: you can get a left handed Squier Sonic Stratocaster. There are no let handed Squier Paranormal Stratocasters.

Telecaster

The Telecaster type guitars in the Paranormal series are the Esquire Deluxe and Cabronita Thinline Telecaster. Here’s how they compare to the Squier Sonic Telecaster:

  • Body Wood: The Squier Sonic Telecaster and the Paranormal Cabronita Thinline Telecaster both have popar bodies. But the Squier Paranormal Esquire Deluxe body is made from okoume.
  • Neck Finish: The Squier Sonic Tele has a satin finish to it’s neck whereas the Paranormal Esquire Deluxe and Cabronita Thinline Telecaster have gloss neck finishes.
  • Frets: The Squier Sonic Telecaster and Paranormal Esquire Deluxe have 21 frets. The Squier Paranormal Cabronita Thinline Telecaster has 22 frets.
  • Pickups: The Squier Sonic Telecaster has Squier ceramic single-Coil or ceramic humbucker pickups. The Squier Paranormal Esquire Deluxe uses Fender-designed wide-range humbuckers and the Squier Paranormal Cabronita Thinline Telecaster uses Fender-designed Alnico single coil Jazzmaster pickups.
  • Controls: The Sonic Squier Tele and Squier Paranormal Esquire Deluxe both have a master volume and master tone. The Squier Paranormal Cabronita Thinline Telecaster has a master volume and master tone but also a 3 way selector switch.
  • Pickup Configuration: The Squier Sonic Telecaster comes in SS and H pickup configurations, the Squier Paranormal Esquire Deluxe only comes in a single humbucker configuration and the Squier Paranormal Cabronita Thinline Telecaster comes in only an HH pickup configuration.
  • Bridge: The Squier Sonic Tele has a 6-saddle top-load bridge with block saddles. The Squier Paranormal Esquire Deluxe has a 6-saddle string-through-body bridge with bent steel saddles. And the Squier Paranormal Cabronita Thinline Telecaster has a 6-saddle strings-through-body hardtail bridge.
  • Tuners: The Squier Sonic Tele has die-cast sealed tuners and the Paranormal Esquire Deluxe and Cabronita Thinline Telecaster both have vintage-style tuners.
  • Left Handed: neither of the Sonic or Paranormal Telecasters have left handed options.

Mustang

The Mustang type guitar in the Paranormal series is the Cyclone. Here’s how it compares to the Squier Sonic Mustang:

  • Scale Length: The Squier Sonic Mustang has a 24″ scale length whereas the Squier Paranormal Cyclone has a 24.75″ scale length.
  • Pickups: The Squier Sonic Mustang uses Squier ceramic single-coil and ceramic humbucker pickups. The Squier Paranormal Cyclone uses Fender┬ádesigned Alnico single-coil pickups.
  • Fretboard Wood: You can get the Squier Sonic Mustang with either an Indian laurel or maple fretboard. The Squier Paranormal Cyclone only comes with an Indian laurel fretboard.
  • Pickup Configuration: The Squier Sonic Mustang comes in SS and HH pickup configurations. The Squier Paranormal Cyclone only comes in an SSS configuration.
  • Bridge: The Squier Sonic Mustang only comes in a hardtail version. The Squier Paranormal Cyclone only comes in a tremolo version.
  • Tuners: The Squier Sonic Mustang has die-cast tuners and the Squier Paranormal Cyclone has vintage style tuners.
  • Left Handed: there are no left handed Sonic Mustangs or Paranormal Cyclones.

Squier Classic Vibe vs Squier Sonic Series

The Classic Vibe Series is the top of the Squier range and so the quality and price matches that. Basically you’re getting a better guitar with better parts and hardware but paying more for it.

They come in 50’s, 60’s and 70’s versions. Each is inspired by the Fender models of those eras. See my guide to the differences between all the Squier Classic Vibe models.

Squier Classic Vibe 50s Stratocaster Electric Guitar, White Blonde, Maple Fingerboard
Squier Classic Vibe 50s Stratocaster in White Blonde

The Classic Vibes are considered exceptionally good value for money though. While they may stretch your budget a bit they’re definitely worth it and a real improvement on most of the other Squiers.

Compared to the Sonic series there’s no doubt the Classic Vibes are the winner. They feel, sound and (I think) look better.

But that improvement comes at a price. You’re going to have to pay extra but will get a guitar that is made to a higher standard, has higher quality parts like a bone nut and has pickups that simply sound better.

So there are some bigger differences between the two series than the others we’ve looked at:

Stratocaster

  • Body Wood: the Squier Sonic Stratocaster has a poplar body. The Squier Classic Vibe 50’s version has a pine or nyatoh (nato) body, the 60’s version has a nyatoh body and the 70’s version has either a soft maple or poplar body.
  • Fretboard Wood: the Squier Sonic Stratocaster has an Indian laurel or maple fretboard. The Classic Vibe 50’s version has a maple fretboard, the 60’s version an Indian Laurel or rosewood fretboard and the 70’s version has either maple or Indian Laurel, depending on the pickup configuration (HSS or SSS).
  • Nut Material: the Squier Classic Vibe Stratocasters of every decade have bone nuts. The Squier Sonic Strat has a synthetic bone nut.
  • Pickups: all the Squier Classic Vibe Strats have Fender designed Alnico single-coil and humbucker pickups. The Squier Sonic Strat has Squier ceramic single-coil and and ceramic humbuckers.
  • Controls: the Squier Classic Vibe Strats have a master volume and 2 tone controls, whereas the Squier Sonic Strat only has a master volume and master tone.
  • Pickup Configuration: The Squier Classic Vibe 50’s and 60’s Stratocasters only come in SSS pickup configurations. The Classic Vibe 70’s Stratocaster comes in SSS or HSS. The Squier Sonic Strat however comes in SSS, HSS and H configurations.
  • Bridge: The Squier Classic Vibe Stratocasters all have 6-saddle vintage-style synchronized tremolo bridges. The Squier Sonic Stratocaster uses the same bridge but for the hardtail version it uses a 6-saddle top-load hardtail with block saddles.
  • Hardware Finish: the Classic Vibe Strats all have nickel hardware finishes, the Squier Sonic Strat has chrome hardware finish.
  • Tuners: the Classic Vibe Strats all have vintage-style tuners whereas the Sonic Strat has sealed die-cast tuners.
  • Inlays: the Squier Sonic Strat has pearloid dot inlays, the Squier Classic Vibe 50’s version has black dot inlays, the 60’s version has white dot inlays and the 70’s version has either black or white dot inlays depending on the pickup configuration (HSS or SSS).
  • Headstock: the Squier Classic Vibe 70’s version has a much larger headstock.
  • Left Handed: You can get a left handed model of the Squier Sonic Stratocaster and the Squier Classic Vibe 60’s and 70’s Stratocasters. The only one that doesn’t have a left handed model is the Classic Vibe 50’s Stratocaster.

Telecaster

  • Body Wood: the Classic Vibe 50’s Telecaster has a pine body, the 60’s a nyatoh (nato) body and the 70’s a poplar body. The Squier Sonic Telecaster only comes in a poplar body.
  • Fretboard Wood: the 50’s and 70’s Classic Vibe Tele’s have maple fretboards, the 60’s an Indian laurel fretboard and the Squier Sonic Tele has either Indian laurel or maple.
  • Nut Material: all of the Squier Classic Vibe Telecasters have bone nuts. The Squier Sonic Telecaster has a synthetic bone nut.
  • Pickups: all the Squier Classic Vibe Telecasters have Fender designed Alnico single-coil and Fender designed wide-range humbucking pickups. The Squier Sonic Telecaster has Squier ceramic single-coil and and ceramic humbucker.
  • Controls: the Squier Classic Vibe 70’s Telecaster Deluxe and Custom Telecaster each have 2 volumes and 2 tone controls. The rest of the Classic Vibe Telecasters have one master volume and one tone control, as does the Squier Sonic Telecaster.
  • Pickup Configuration: The Squier Classic Vibe 50’s and 60’s Telecasters only come in SS pickup configurations. The Classic Vibe 70’s Telecaster comes in SH or HH. The Squier Sonic Telecaster comes in SS and H configurations.
  • Bridge: The Squier Sonic Telecaster comes with a 6-saddle top-load bridge with block saddles. The Classic Vibe 50’s Telecaster has a 3-saddle vintage-style strings-through-body bridge with chrome barrel saddles. The 60’s has a 3-saddle vintage-style strings-through-bode bridge with chrome barrel saddles. The 70’s comes with either a 3-saddle vintage-style strings-through-body bridge with chrome barrel saddles, 6-saddle vintage-style strat strings-through-body hardtail bridge or 6-saddle strings-through-body tele bridge.
  • Hardware Finish: the Classic Vibe Teles all have nickel hardware finishes, the Squier Sonic Tele has chrome hardware finish.
  • Tuners: the Classic Vibe Teles all have vintage-style tuners whereas the Sonic Tele has sealed die-cast tuners.
  • Inlays: the Squier Sonic Tele has pearloid dot inlays, the Squier Classic Vibe 50’s version has black dot inlays, the 60’s version has white dot inlays and the 70’s version has black dot inlays.
  • Left Handed: You can’t get a left handed model of the Squier Sonic Telecaster. The only left handed model from the Classic Vibe Telecasters is the 50’s version.

Mustang

  • Nut Material: the Squier Sonic Mustang has a synthetic bone nut whereas the Squier Classic Vibe 60’s Mustang has a bone nut.
  • Pickups: the Squier Classic Vibe Mustang has Fender designed Alnico single-coil pickups. The Squier Sonic Mustang has Squier ceramic single-coil and and ceramic humbucker pickups.
  • Pickup Configuration: The Squier Classic Vibe 60’s Mustang only comes in an SS pickup configuration. The Squier Sonic Mustang comes in SS and HH configurations.
  • strong>Bridge: The Squier Sonic Mustang comes with a 6-saddle top-load hardtail with block saddles. The Squier Classic Vibe Mustang comes with a floating bridge with dynamic vibrato tailpiece.
  • Hardware Finish: the Classic Vibe Mustang has nickel hardware finish, the Squier Sonic Mustang has chrome hardware finish.
  • Tuners: the Classic Vibe Mustang has vintage-style tuners whereas the Sonic Mustang has sealed die-cast tuners.
  • Inlays: the Squier Sonic Mustang has pearloid dot or black dot inlays, the Squier Classic Vibe 60’s Mustang has white dot inlays.

Squier Sonic Series vs Fender

Fender guitars are considerably more expensive than Squier guitars. This is to do with the parts that are used and the way they are produced.

But whilst they are technically better guitars in the way they are made and the quality control that doesn’t make the Squier Sonic range bad. A Squier of any series is still a perfectly good instrument that is more than good enough to learn on or play.

Is the Squier Sonic Good Value?

Yes. As they are an entry level guitar they are one of Squiers most affordable series of guitars. This makes them a good choice for beginners as you don’t have to spend too much. Especially if you aren’t sure guitar is going to be for you.

They’re also a great modding platform for those more experienced players. You can buy an inexpensive Squier Sonic and then start trying different pickups, bridges, nuts etc.

Should You Get One?

If you are a beginner or buying your first guitar then a Squier Sonic will be a great choice. They’re affordable, look good and are designed for those who are learning to play.

As you can get various models with different pickup configurations you can find a guitar that is suited to the style of music you want to play.

Where are the Squier Sonic Series Made?

All of the guitars in the Squier Sonic range are made in Indonesia. This is the same as the Squier Affinity series that the Sonic replaced.

About Andy Fraser

I'm Andy and I've been crazy about music, and specifically the guitar, for longer than I can remember. It's this passion and enthusiasm about all things guitar that drove me to start this website. A place where I could talk about the gear, techniques and general awesomeness that is the best instrument. I began playing somewhat late compared to a lot of people. I was 15 years old as it had taken me a while to find the confidence to believe in myself and take that step to learn to play an instrument. It started my lifelong love of music and playing in general. Since then like so many before me I've become an addict and gone through more guitars, amps and gear than I care to remember. Guitar Inside Out is my way of sharing that love and passion with the music community and hopefully inspiring and helping others to enjoy it as much as I do. Learn more about Andy

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